Our Programs

TITLE I, PART A (ESEA)

 

Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA), as amended, provides financial assistance through the Arkansas Department of Education (State Educational Agencies – SEAs) to Little Rock School District (Local Educational Agencies – LEAs) and public schools. 

The Little Rock School District supports two program designs that meet the needs of the majority of our students:  Schoolwide Program or Targeted Assistance Program.

 

Schoolwide  Program

 

Core Elements of a Schoolwide Program:

  • the comprehensive needs assessment
  • the comprehensive site plan
  • the annual review of the plan

Compliance Requirements: A school operating a Schoolwide Program must retain documentation related to the three core components.  Documentation should be kept on site for at least five (5) years. Documents should be accessible to all stakeholders and may be requested by the Arkansas Department of Education (ADE) for monitoring purposes.

A schoolwide program must upgrade the entire educational program in the school in order to raise academic achievement for all the students.  A school with a schoolwide program must include these requirements in its Arkansas Consolidated School Improvement Plan (ACSIP).

 

NCLB, Title I, Part A – Section  1114

(no Child Left Behind – NCLB)

 

1.Needs assessment

Analyzed data for the following should be indicated: combined population of the school; all subgroup data from state required achievement exams; local achievement assessments; attendance or graduation rates; relevant sources to determine student learning needs. Specific grade levels and/or content area information should be recognized as main concerns.  Achievement gaps between subpopulations should be identified.

2.School-wide Reform Strategies that

  • Provide opportunities for all children to meet the State’s proficient and advanced levels of student academic achievement;
  • Use effective methods and instructional strategies based on scientifically-based research that strengthen the core program, increase the amount and quality of learning time, and include strategies for meeting the educational needs of historically underserved populations;
  •  Include strategies to meet the needs of all children in the school and address how the school will determine if those needs have been met; and
  • Are consistent with and are designed to implement the State and local improvement plans, if any.

3.Instruction by highly qualified teachers.

All teachers should be certified in the fields in which they are teaching.

4.Professional development

Professional development should be based on the needs assessment and tied to the school improvement plan. The professional development offerings should be of high quality and directed toward improving instruction. Principals, teachers, paraprofessionals and other appropriate personnel should be included in the planning and implementation of professional development. Follow up activities and monitoring for implementation of the professional development must be included in the school improvement plan.

5.Strategies to attract highly qualified teachers

Strategies are used to recruit and retain highly qualified teachers to high-need schools should be indicated.

6.Parent involvement

Activities should be included in the school improvement plan to increase parental participation in educational programs and their child’s education. Parents are involved in the development of the school’s parent involvement policy, evaluation of the parent involvement program and the learning compacts.

7.Transition

The school provide for activities to ease the student’s emotional and academic transition from early childhood programs to elementary school programs.

8.Collaboration

Teachers should be included in the selection of academic assessments, the analysis of data, and the development of the overall instructional program in order to improve student achievement.

9.Point-in-time remediation

Activities to ensure that students who experience difficulty mastering the proficient or advanced levels of academic achievement standards required by the state shall be provided with effective, timely additional assistance which shall include measures to ensure that students’ difficulties are identified on a timely basis and to provide sufficient information on which to base effective assistance.

10.Coordination and integration of Federal, State, and local services and programs

Federal, state, and local funds should be used to coordinate and integrate services to improve instruction and increase student achievement.

                                                                                                       

 Title I Schoolwide Programs Are Operated in the Following Schools:

Title I Elementary Schools                                                      

Bale                                         Otter Creek

Baseline                                   Pulaski Heights

Booker                                       Rockefeller 

Brady                                         Romine

Carver                                       Stephens

Chicot                                        Terry

Dodd                                         Wakefield                           

Franklin                                     Washington

Gibbs                                         Watson   

King                                           Western Hills

Mabelvale                                Williams

McDermott                               Wilson              

Meadowcliff            

 

 

Title I Secondary Schools

Cloverdale Middle                                                                                                                

 Dunbar Middle

 Henderson Middle

Mabelvale Middle

Mann Middle

Pulaski Heights Middle

 

J. A. Fair High           

Hall High

McClellan High

Parkview High

                                 

Title  I  Academies

Forest Heights STEM Academy (K-8) 

Geyer Springs Gifted & Talented Academy (1-5)          

 

 

Targeted Assistance Program

NCLB – Title I, Part A, Section 1115

The goal of a targeted assistance school is to improve teaching and learning to enable Title I participants to meet the state’s challenging academic standards that all children are expected to master. The following eight components must be included in a targeted assistance program.

1.Title I resources should be used to help participating children meet the State's challenging student academic achievement standards expected for all children.

2.Planning for students served should be incorporated into the plan.

3.Methods and instructional strategies should be used by school personnel based on scientifically-based research that strengthens the core academic program of the school and gives primary consideration to providing extended learning time, such as an extended school year, before-and after-school, and summer programs and opportunities; the school provides an accelerated, high-quality curriculum, including applied learning, to minimize removing children from the regular classroom during regular school hours for instruction provided under Title I.

4.Title I resources should coordinate with and support the regular education program. This may include services to assist preschool children in the transition from early childhood programs such as Head Start, Even Start, Early Reading First or State-run preschool (ABC) programs to elementary school programs.

5.Instruction should be provided by highly qualified teachers.

6.Opportunities for professional development should be provided with Title I resources, and, to the extent practicable, from other sources, for teachers, principals, and paraprofessionals, including, if appropriate, pupil services personnel, parents, and other staff, who work with participating children in programs under Title I or in the regular education program.

7.Strategies should be included to increase parental involvement, such as family literacy services.

8.Provisions should be evident to coordinate and integrate federal, state, and local services and programs, including programs supported under the No Child Left Behind Act, violence prevention programs, nutrition programs, housing programs, Head Start, adult education, vocational and technical education, and job training.

 

Private   Schools

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) requires Little Rock School District (LEA) to provide eligible children attending private elementary and secondary schools, their teachers, and their families with Title I services.  These services or benefits must be equitable to those provided to eligible public school children, their teachers, and their families.

 

INTRODUCTION: Title I Assistance in Participating Private Schools

The Title I program provides supplemental educational services so that all children have a fair, equal, and significant opportunity to obtain a high-quality education.  Generally, to qualify for assistance under Title I, a student must reside within the attendance area of a participating public school located in a low-income area and be failing, or at risk of failing, to meet student academic achievement standards.

Under Title I, local educational agencies (LEAs) are required to provide services for eligible private school students, as well as eligible public school students.  In particular, §1120 of Title I, Part A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), as amended by the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), requires a participating LEA to provide eligible children attending private elementary and secondary schools, their teachers, and their families with Title I services or other benefits that are equitable to those provided to eligible public school children, their teachers, and their families. 

The Title I services for private school students must be developed in consultation with officials of the private schools.  NCLB strengthened these requirements by, among other things, requiring meetings with private school officials and a written affirmation signed by private school officials that the required consultation has occurred.

The amount of Title I funds allocated to each participating public school attendance area is determined mainly on the basis of the total number of low-income students—both public and private–residing in each area.  Expenditures for private school students in each area generally are determined based on the proportion of students from low-income families residing in that area who attend private school.

The Title I services provided by the LEA for private school participants are designed to meet their educational needs and supplement the educational services provided by the private school. These services may be provided by the LEA, or by a contractor who is independent of the private school and any religious organization.  Title I services or benefits must be secular, neutral, and non-ideological.

 

A.  CONSULTATION

The requirements for consultation are in §1120(b) of the Title I statute and §200.63 of the Title I regulations.

Consultation with officials from private schools is an essential requirement in the implementation by an LEA of an effective Title I program for eligible private school children, their teachers, and their families.

A-1.  What is consultation?

Consultation involves discussions between public and private school officials on key issues that affect the ability of eligible private school students to participate equitably in Title I programs.  Effective consultation provides a genuine opportunity for all parties to express their views and to have those views considered.  Successful consultation establishes positive and productive working relationships that make planning easier and ensure that the Title I services provided meet the needs of eligible students.

A unilateral offer of services by an LEA with no opportunity for discussion is not adequate consultation.  Only after discussing key issues relating to the provision of Title I services should the LEA make its final decisions with respect to the Title I services to be provided to eligible private school children, their teachers, and their families.

A-2.  How do LEAs begin the consultation process?

Annually an LEA must contact officials of private schools with children who reside in the LEA regardless of whether the private school they attend is located in the LEA.  One way to accomplish this is for the LEA to extend an invitation to officials of the private schools and convene a meeting with them at which LEA officials explain the intent of Title I and the roles of public and private school officials and provide opportunities for the private school officials to ask questions.  It is not adequate consultation merely to send a letter to officials of the private schools explaining the intent of Title I.

A-3.  When does an LEA consult with private school officials?

Consultation by an LEA must include meetings between the LEA and appropriate private school officials and must occur before the LEA makes any decision that affects the opportunity for eligible private school children, their teachers, and their families to participate in Title I programs.  For example, if the LEA signs teacher contracts or orders supplies and equipment for the Title I program in the spring, the LEA must consult with the appropriate private school officials before signing those teacher contracts with Title I teachers or ordering supplies and equipment to provide Title I services for private school students.  

A-4.  Who participates in the consultation process?

Consultation includes appropriate public school officials and representatives of private schools and their central administrative offices, if appropriate.  Private school officials can facilitate consultation by informing the LEA of which private school officials should be included in the consultation process and their roles and authority.

A-5.  How long does consultation continue?

An LEA must meet with appropriate private school officials throughout the implementation and assessment of Title I services.  This consultation must include early discussions to prepare for the next school year so that there is a timely start of the Title I program at the beginning of each school year, and throughout its implementation and assessment of services.

A-6.  What are the regulatory requirements for consultation?

Under §200.63 of the Title I regulations consultation must, at a minimum, address the following issues:

  • How the LEA will identify the needs of eligible private school children.
  • What services the LEA will offer to eligible private school children.
  • How and when the LEA will make decisions about the delivery of services.
  • How, where, and by whom the LEA will provide services to eligible private school children.
  • How the LEA will assess academically the services to private school children in accordance with §200.10 of the Title I regulations, and how the LEA will use the results of that assessment to improve Title I services.
  • The size and scope of the equitable services that the LEA will provide to eligible private school children and, consistent with §200.64 of the Title I regulations, the proportion of its Title I funds that the LEA will allocate for these services and the amount of funds that the LEA reserves from its Title I allocation for the purposes listed in §200.77 of the Title I regulations.
  • The method, or the sources of data, that the LEA will use (under §200.78 of the Title I regulations) to determine the number of private school children from low-income families residing in participating public school attendance areas, including whether the LEA will extrapolate data if a survey is used.
  • The services the LEA will provide to teachers and families of participating private school children.

Consultation must also include:

  • Discussion of service delivery mechanisms the LEA will use to provide services; and

§  Thorough consideration and analysis of the views of the private school officials on whether the LEA should contract with a third-party provider.  If the LEA disagrees with the views of the private school officials on that issue, the LEA must provide in writing to those officials the reasons why the LEA has chosen not to use a third-party contractor.


B.  EQUITABLE SERVICES TO PRIVATE SCHOOLS

Parent Involvement Reservation under Section 1118 of ESEA

Section 1118 of Title I requires an LEA to reserve funds off the top of its Title I allocation to carry out required Title I parental involvement activities.  Section 200.65 of the regulations requires the LEA to calculate the amount of funds available for parental involvement activities from the reserved funds based on the proportion of private school children from low-income families residing in participating public school attendance areas.

Professional Development Reservation under Section 1119 of ESEA

Section 200.65 of the Title I regulations requires that, if an LEA Reserves funds for professional development under section 200.77, an LEA must ensure that classroom teachers of participating private school students receive  professional development on an equitable basis.

Districtwide Instructional Activities under Section 1118 of ESEA

Section 200.64/200.77 of the Title I Regulations requires that, if the LEA has reserved funds for district wide instructional activities, including extension services equitable services may apply.

 

Reference:  ADE School Improvement Planning, ACSIP Handbook, 2011 – 2012

 

TITLE  I  PRIVATE SCHOOLS – LRSD

 

1.      Christ the King Catholic School (4002 North Rodney Parham Road)

2.      Our Lady of the Holy Souls School (1001 North Tyler Street)

3.      St. Edward School Catholic School (805 Sherman Street)

4.      St. Theresa School Catholic School (6311 Baseline Road)

5.      The Huda Academy (3221 Anna Street)

 

McKINNEY-VENTO

According to McKinney-Vento, the term ‘homeless children and youth’ means individuals who lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence (within the meaning of section 103(a) (1).  Homeless includes –

  • Children and youth are sharing the housing of other persons due to loss of housing, economic hardship, or a similar reason; Living in motels, hotels, trailer parks, or camping grounds due to the lack of alternative adequate accommodations are living in emergency or transition shelters; Abandoned in hospitals; or Awaiting foster care placement;
  • Children and youth who have a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not designed for or ordinarily used as a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings (within meaning of section 103(a)(2)(C);
  • Children and youth who are living in cars, parks, public spaces, abandoned buildings, substandard housing, bus or train stations, or similar settings; and
  • Migratory children (as such term is defined in section 1309 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965) who qualify as homeless for the purposes of this subtitle because the children are living in circumstances described in clauses above.

Reference:  McKinney-Vento Section 725(1)(2)

 

Title   I   Homeless  Program  and  Services

Homeless Children and Youth

Homeless Children:  Districts must provide comparable services for homeless children who do not attend participating Title I schools, including providing educationally related support services to children in shelters. The services must be comparable to those provided to children in Title I schools. A district must set aside funds (regardless of receiving a McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Grant) for homeless children attending schools not served by Title I.

The purpose of Title I, Part A, as amended by ESEA, is designed to help disadvantaged children reach high academic standards. Homeless children are individuals who lack a fixed, regular and adequate nighttime residence. It also includes children who are sharing the housing of other persons due to loss of housing, economic hardship, living in motels, mobile home parks, camping grounds, emergency shelters or foster care due to the lack of adequate accommodations.

A district must set aside funds from Title I for any children within their system who are homeless. Title I funds are to provide comparable services to homeless children who are not attending Title I schools. (This use of Title I funds must be allocated to meet basic needs, such as clothing, supplies and health care, so that these students may participate more fully in school. All fees for any extra-curricular activities must be waived.)

A district must provide students experiencing homelessness with transportation to and from their school of origin, at a parent or guardian’s request.

Any student designated as a homeless student will automatically receive free/reduced lunch.

An action should be included in the district ACSIP plan stating that your district will set aside funds as required by the McKinney-Vento Act. List the school liaison as the person responsible, then complete with timeline, resources and source of funds.

 

Compliance Requirements:

Section 1113 of the Elementary Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) requires Little Rock School District (Local Educational AgencyLEA) to reserve funds as are necessary under Title I, Part A to provide services to children attending non-Title I schools that is comparable to services the LRSD provides to children in Title I schools.  Services are supplemental and should supplement local funding in the absence of McKinney Vento grant funds.  Services may include providing educationally related support services as well as basic needs (clothing, supplies and health care).

 

Definition of Homeless Children and Youth:

  • Children and youth who are sharing the housing of other persons due to loss of housing, economic hardship, or a similar reason (sometimes referred to as doubled-up); living in motels, hotels, trailer parks, or camping grounds due to lack of alternative adequate accommodations; living in emergency or transitional shelters; abandoned in hospitals; or awaiting foster care placement.
  • Children and youth who have a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not designed for, or ordinarily used as, a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings.
  • Children and youth who are living in cars, parks, public spaces, abandoned buildings, substandard housing, bus or train stations, or similar settings.
  • Migratory children who qualify as homeless because they are living in circumstances described above.

 

Reference:  ADE School Improvement Planning, ACSIP Handbook, 2011 – 2012

 

 

Neglected  and  Delinquent

(Child or Youth)

 

ESEA Title I, Part A, Section 1113, (3) (B)

Title I Services to Children in Local Institutions for Neglected Children

Section 101 of ESEA; Title I, Part A – Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged (Children in Local Institutions for Neglected Children)

The definition of an institution for neglected children and youth is a public or private residential facility, other than a foster home, that is operated for the care of children who have been committed to the institution or voluntarily placed in the institution under applicable State law, due to abandonment, neglect or death of their parents or guardians.

 

Funds – The amount of funds generated by children in local institutions for neglected children is a part of the Title I, Part A allocation. The Neglected and Delinquent Office of ADE conducts a child count survey in the fall of each school year; these counts determine funding for the following school year. This child count survey is then used by the Federal Grants Management office to determine set asides for each facility. Facilities that elect not to return the survey or return the survey after the deadline will not be considered for funding. Once allocations are completed, the Local Education Agency (LEA) is officially notified by a Commissioner’s Memo for Title I allotments that is disseminated from the Federal Grants Management (FGM) office. It identifies the dollar amount for the local institution for neglected children. Funds for services for children in these institutions should be placed in the LEA’s set aside under budget code Function-1594 Title I, Part A Neglected Institutions (Fund 6501 ONLY) prior to any Title I, Part A funds being distributed to individual schools. Before providing services or any use of funds, a LEA should consult with officials from the identified eligible facilities.

  • Consultation – The LEA must consult with officials from the institution(s) to determine the type of services, including conducting a needs assessment. Documentation must be on file in the LEA Title I office that demonstrates institution officials are being consulted in a timely manner.
  • Services – Services are provided to any children residing in a local institution for neglected children. A needs assessment must be conducted to determine which services will be most beneficial. Information may include, but not limited to number of graduates, number of students attending college and the number of students advancing at least one grade level while at the institution. The following are examples of Title I services that may be provided to children in the institution:
  • Tutoring services are provided in addition to the assistance being provided to children who are attending public schools and receiving Title I services.
  • Counseling/peer mediation services to help children in transition from the facility back to school.
  • Computers, software and other equipment to enhance the learning experience and assist children with homework, reinforce concepts, etc.
  • Books and materials specifically designed to increase student achievement – including but not limited to – high interest/low vocabulary books, etc.
  • Evaluation – There is no separate evaluation for children in local institutions for neglected children for Title I accountability purposes. However, an ample amount of data will be collected regarding the number of children participating by race, ethnicity, age, gender, academic and vocational outcomes and subject area.

NEGLECTED:  An individual (child, youth, or student) who has been committed to an institution (other than a foster home) or voluntarily placed under applicable State law due to abandonment, neglect, or death of his/her parents or guardians.

NEGLECTED INSTITUTION: An institution for neglected children and youth is a public or private residential facility, other than a foster home, that is operated primarily for the care of children and youth who have been committed to the institution or voluntarily placed there under applicable state law due to (1) abandonment, (2) neglect, or (3) death of their parents or guardians.  Note that for Subpart 1 purposes, these facilities must have an average length of stay of 30 days. 

DELINQUENT:  An individual (child, youth, or student) who resides in a public or private residential facility other than a foster home that is operated for the care of children and youth who have been adjudicated delinquent or in need of supervision.

DELINQUENT INSTITUTION:  An institution for delinquent children and youth is a public or private residential facility other than a foster home that is operated for the care of children and youth who have been adjudicated delinquent or in need of supervision.  Delinquent facilities include facilities for detention, juvenile corrections and adult corrections.  Note that for Supplant I purposes, these facilities must have an average length of stay of 30 days.

Title I, Part A

In Arkansas, all eligible neglected facilities receive Title I, Part A funding.  This funding is to support eligible neglected facilities that provide the majority of its students' educational services within the local school districts who have been placed by the courts due to abandonment, abuse, or parental neglect.  Title I, Part A funds are used to provide education and funding for students who reside in these Neglected programs.  The nature of their placement dictates whether they attend school in a public or secured, in-house setting.

Reference:  ADE School Improvement Planning, ACSIP Handbook, 2011 – 2012

 

Title I Neglected & Delinquent (N/D) Facilities – LRSD

1.      Arkansas Baptist Children’s Home – Promise House (6 Physician Court)

2.      Centers for Youth and Families – Adolescence (6601 West 12th Street)

3.      Centers for Youth and Families – Children  (6601 West 12th Street)

4.      Free Will Baptist School (3600 West 11th Street)

5.      Pfeifer Kiwanis Camp (5512 Ferndale Cut Off Road)

6.      United Methodist Children’s Home – UMCH (2002 South Fillmore Street)

 

 

Parent  Involvement/Parent Engagement

 

Parental Involvement (refer to LRSD/Title I Parent Involvement link)

Parental involvement always has been a centerpiece of Title I.  The statute defines parental involvement as the participation of parents in regular, two-way, and meaningful communication involving student academic learning and other school activities ensuring:

§  that parents play an integral role in assisting their child’s learning;

§  that parents are encouraged to be actively involved in their child’s education at school;

§  that parents are full partners in their child’s education and are included, as appropriate, in decision-making and on advisory committees to assist in the education of their child; and

§  that other activities are carried out, such as those described in section 1118 of the ESEA (Parental Involvement). [Section 9101(32), ESEA.]

 

NATIONAL NETWORK OF PARTNERSHIP SCHOOLS (NNPS)

LRSD NNPS FAMILY MODEL – SCHOOL, FAMILY, AND COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS

NNPS www.partnershipschools.org

 

The Little Rock School District has adopted the Johns Hopkins University National Network of Partnership Schools (NNPS) family model.  The School, Family and Community Partnerships model is designed to enhance parent participation and involvement in the school and community to increase student achievement.  The model is researched based and references engagement, activities, and resources for the six types of involvement: Parenting, Communicating, Volunteering, Student Learning, Decision-Making and Collaborating with the Community. 

The Little Rock School District parent and community involvement efforts have been divided into three school cluster teams.  The teams collaborate in their school feeder pattern to provide workshops regarding the six types of involvement. Specialized training is provided by Specialists of the Title I Parent Involvement Office. The teams will host a grade transition and community collaboration activity during the school year.

  • CENTRAL/EAST TEAM

Leader, Gregory Hodges; Parent Facilitator, Central High; Recorder, Susan Merry; Parent Facilitator, Mann Magnet Middle School

  • SOUTHWEST TEAM

Leader, Dr. Angela Dallas; Parent Facilitator, Cloverdale Middle Academy; Recorder, Jessica Conedy; Title I Parent Coordinator, McClellan High School

  • WEST TEAM

Co-Leader, Millie Jones; Parent Facilitator, McDermott; Pamela Lewis; Parent Facilitator, Roberts;  Co-Recorder, Sharon Johnson;  Parent Facilitator, Henderson; Laurine Williams, Fair Park ECC

Through implementation of the NNPS family model, the Little Rock School District has received national awards and has been showcased in the NNPS Promising Partnerships Practice publication for the past three (3) years.  The following citations are the articles that have been included in the NNPS publication.


2014

Criss, P. (2014). Fall for learning math and reading night. In B. G. Thomas, M. D. Greenfeld,  E.

K. Paker, & J. L. Epstein (Eds.). Promising partnership practices: An annual collection from the members of the National Network of Partnership Schools (p. 29). Baltimore, Maryland: NNPS at Johns Hopkins University. 

Thomas. N. (2014).  Cradle love. In B. G. Thomas, M. D. Greenfeld,  E. K. Paker, & J. L. Epstein

(Eds.). Promising partnership practices: An annual collection from the members of the National Network of Partnership Schools (p. 35). Baltimore, Maryland: NNPS at Johns Hopkins University.

Dallas, A. (2014). Getting to know us. In B. G. Thomas, M. D. Greenfeld,  E. K. Paker, & J. L.

Epstein (Eds.). Promising partnership practices: An annual collection from the members of the National Network of Partnership Schools (p. 50). Baltimore, Maryland: NNPS at Johns Hopkins University.

Rainey, K. & Lindsey, K. (2014). School cluster teams. In B. G. Thomas, M. D. Greenfeld,  E.

K. Paker, & J. L. Epstein (Eds.). Promising partnership practices: An annual collection from the members of the National Network of Partnership Schools (p. 80). Baltimore, Maryland: NNPS at Johns Hopkins University.

Dallas, A. (2014). Transition expedition. In B. G. Thomas, M. D. Greenfeld,  E. K. Paker, & J. L.

Epstein (Eds.). Promising partnership practices: An annual collection from the members of the National Network of Partnership Schools (p. 81). Baltimore, Maryland: NNPS at Johns Hopkins University.

Pamela Criss is the Parent Facilitator for Chicot Primary and Early Childhood Center.

Angela Dallas, EdD is the Parent Facilitator for Cloverdale Aerospace Technology Conversion Charter Middle School.

Kamesha Lindsey is the Little Rock School District Parent/Community Engagement Specialist.

Kaye Rainey is the Little Rock School District Parent Involvement Specialist. 

Nicole Thomas is the Parent/Community Liaison for Hall High School.


2013

Madison, Z. (2013). Boys leadership program. In B. G. Thomas, M. D. Greenfeld,  E. K. Paker, & D.

            J. Hutchins (Eds.). Promising partnership practices: An annual collection from the members of

            the National Network of Partnership Schools (p. 44). Baltimore, Maryland: NNPS at Johns            Hopkins University.

 

Zora Madison is the Parent Facilitator for Western Hills Elementary School.

 

2012

Rainey, K. (2012). Stay connected and online with technology. In B. G. Thomas, M. D. Greenfeld,  E.

            K. Paker, & D. J. Hutchins (Eds.). Promising partnership practices: An annual collection from      the members of  the National Network of Partnership Schools (p. 91). Baltimore, Maryland:     NNPS at Johns Hopkins University.

 

Kaye Rainey is the Little Rock School District Parent Involvement Specialist. 

 

 

Title  I  Parent  Activity  Calendar

 

National Family and Community Engagement Conference (Chicago, Illinois)

Arkansas Parent Coordinators Conference

ChildCare Aware Parent School Involvement Conference

Community Collaboration (attend monthly meetings)

Computer Power Day PLUS Parent Academy for Student Success Workshops (Technology)–(Semesters 1 & 2)

Connect with Kids (CWK) Network Webinars

Conversational Spanish Classes

Distribute Parent Involvement Materials to Schools and Provide Lending Library

District Parent Involvement Committee Meetings/National Network of Partnership Schools (NNPS) Team Leaders Training

District Title I Parent Involvement Committee Meetings

Grade Transition Activity for NNPS Cluster Teams

Literacy Parent Training – Scholastic FACE (Family and Community Engagement) (six weeks)

MADD Power of Parents

National Title I Conference

NNPS Conference (Baltimore, Maryland)

NNPS Training for Parent Coordinators/Parent Facilitators/Educators

Parent Academy for Student Success Back-to-School Parent Involvement Conference (School Cluster Teams)

Parent Coordinator Training (monthly)

Parent Coordinator/Parent Facilitator Training – Literacy (Scholastics)

Parent Facilitators/Coordinators/Liaisons Training

Parent Involvement Professional Development (monthly)

Parent-Student Involvement Fantasy Football for Mathematics

Title I Parent Involvement Plan due to Arkansas Department of Education

Title I Summer Parent Academy for Student Success (PASS)